Genetics and physical fitness



Both athletes and those who exercise for recreation are affected by non-contact muscle injuries which account for a large proportion of sports injuries. Genetic factors have been identified as playing a role in the susceptibility of an individual to not only sustain injuries but also an individual’s muscle recovery time.


Both athletes and those who exercise for recreation are affected by non-contact muscle injuries (NCMI) which account for a large proportion of sports injuries. Athletes’ are particularly affected as it affects their career and performance, team results, and financial aspects. Recently, genetic factors have been identified as playing a role in the susceptibility of an athlete to sustain NCMI (Lim et al., 2021). In addition, it has become apparent that genetic variability can impact inter-individual variation in the response to exercise-induced muscle damage. Certain polymorphisms have been associated with exercise-induced muscle damage. These polymorphisms include TNF(−308 G>A, rs1800629),ACTN3(R577X, rs1815739),IGF2(ApaI, 17200 G>A, rs680), and IL6(−174 G>C, rs1800795). Being able to make informed predictions regarding how someone is likely to respond to a particular type of exercise will help coaches and practitioners individualise the training regimes of their athletes or patients, thus maximising recovery and performance while reducing injury risk (Baumert et al., 2016).


Edinburgh Genetics use a range of sequencing techniques and technologies to provide individualised genetic fitness reports.


At Edinburgh Genetics, we offer customised genetic testing solutions to provide insights into how best to approach muscle training and recovery based on an individual's unique genetic makeup.


Contact us today to find out more.


Related Links:

  1. egSEQ NGS

  2. Library Preparation

  3. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Services

  4. Bioinformatics Services


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